Making the Rough Places Plane

Emily Penfield Featured

The Trustees are working toward having the parking lots fixed.  The lot connected to the alley will be completely repaved, while the one adjacent to the church building will most likely have repairs and sealing done.  In hearing how the pavers do their work, I learned there is a lot to be done before new asphalt can be laid.  If you’ve driven in that lot, you know it’s a rough piece of land. Holes have to be plugged, roots and a stump have to be dug out and cracks have to be filled.  Cleaning comes next to remove all the debris.  Finally the new layer of asphalt will be put down, and smoothed out by a big roller.  Soon after, we will be able to drive and park on a level lot.  A rough place made plane within a day or two.

The prophet Isaiah uses these words “the rough places a plain” in a portion of writing about preparing the way for the Messiah.  Make the highway straight, the valleys lifted up and the mountains made low, and the crooked land straight.  This is all so the Messiah can have an express route to us.  In metaphorical language, when we do our part of straightening out our lives we can receive Christ in a more direct fashion.

Lent is a season to do some clearing out.  Getting rid of unnecessary distractions, drama, and grudges is a good place to start.  Taking on a routine that includes reflection, self-examination and prayer is also helpful.  We can call on God for forgiveness, and smoothing our nature that might be abrasive.  Jesus can fill our holes and cracks with hope and love, which will level out our lives.  Of course, this isn’t just for Lent, but every day.

I hope you will take advantage of all our Lenten offerings.  If you need a listening ear, I’m readily available for you.  I want you to be your best self and have a life with few potholes and bumpy spots.  And I know God can help this happen.


P.S.  We hope to have the parking lot project completed by the summer.